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News

2008

August

26
  • Communities become home buyers to fight decay. As a wave of home foreclosures courses through the United States, some of the nation’s hardest hit cities think they have found a way to ease the blight left on their communities by the crisis.…
  • Foreclosures ensnare low-income renters. Ruth Cordoba has never owned a home, but she is feeling the effects of the mortgage meltdown acutely. Cordoba, 28, rented a three-bedroom home in Riverside for six months with the help of so-called Section…
  • Options on dwindling student loans. Your child will be a college freshman this year, and you're a little apprehensive. Will she pass Econ 101? Eat her vegetables? Come home for Thanksgiving with an anarchist boyfriend and a full body tattoo?…
  • Heating bills may burn through wallets. Consumers may be enjoying some relief at the gasoline pump, but another energy shock likely is just around the corner. Winter bills for heating oil, natural gas and electricity are expected to soar to records,…
25
  • Tax revolt brewing in some states. And to think they used to call it "Taxachusetts." On Election Day, Massachusetts will vote on whether to eliminate its state income tax. Advocates hope victory in a place long thought of as a free-spending…
  • FBI saw threat of mortgage crisis. ong before the mortgage crisis began rocking Main Street and Wall Street, a top FBI official made a chilling, if little-noticed, prediction: The booming mortgage business, fueled by low interest rates and soaring home values,…
  • Markets need more regulation, Fed told. Financial markets need to be more tightly regulated to prevent financial crises and quash perceptions that some firms are too big to fail and will be rescued by the government, central bankers and economists suggested…
  • Heating bills may burn through wallets. Consumers may be enjoying some relief at the gasoline pump, but another energy shock likely is just around the corner. Winter bills for heating oil, natural gas and electricity are expected to soar to records,…
24
  • Save green by going green. The environment finally has its day in the sun. While climate concerns have been mounting for some time, this past year's rising gas prices and their domino effect on other costs have kick-started the effort…
  • Avoid account inactivity for extended periods. When Valorie Golin went to visit her parents in March, the first thing she did was get into their bank accounts. Golin had no larcenous intent. Quite the opposite. The 32-year-old banker was trying to…
  • Answers, not IOUs, for Social Security. Whatever happened to Social Security? As the Democrats prepare to convene this week in Denver, and the Republicans gear up for their get-together in St. Paul, Minn., starting Sept. 1, precious little has been said…
  • When cutting home price, take one big bite. Cutting the price to get your home sold isn't quite as simple as it seems. When to cut? How much to cut? One big reduction or gradual discounts? Price high and negotiate down? Price low…
23
  • Flex time appeals to younger workers. They have replaced incandescent light bulbs with compact fluorescents, cut the number of cars in their fleets and embraced hybrids. They have planted native grasses to cut down on lawn maintenance and, with it, fuel…
21
  • FDIC throws IndyMac homeowners a lifeline. Federal regulators yesterday announced a plan to systematically modify the loans of at least 25,000 homeowners with mortgages held by failed lender IndyMac in an attempt to create an industry model for assisting troubled borrowers.…
  • Keeping the IRS in check. Nina E. Olson, the official appointed to speak out on behalf of U.S. taxpayers, has a few major gripes about the Internal Revenue Service. Among them, she believes the agency needs to better protect victims…
19
  • Property tax reduced for Bay Area homeowners (Chinese). 【明報專訊】樓市泡沫過後,物業業主承受著房價下跌、供樓負擔上升的艱苦過渡期,灣區業主向地方估值官辦公室,申請重估物業稅求助個案驟增。上周五為重估物業估值申請截止期限,有地方估值官辦公室預測,今年有超過3萬個物業單位可獲扣減物業稅。 在經濟不景及次貸危機陰霾籠罩下,不少物業業主苦不堪言,供樓負擔令生活百上加斤,地方政府能提供的協助,最直接的相信是提供審核物業估值免費服務,倘符合資格可調低業主應繳付地稅,算是紓解燃眉之急的一途。除了與銀行商討重整貸款或債務,業主不妨向地方估值官辦公室申請調減物業稅之審核,或有助紓緩個人或家庭財務壓力。
  • Shifting to a greener attitude on tire ratings. As Americans try to squeeze every last mile out of a gallon of gasoline, one regulatory option hasn't been given much of a road test: telling consumers the fuel efficiency of their tires. Now, as…
  • GM returns to employee pricing. General Motors (GM), aiming to boost sagging sales, rolled out a major promotion for U.S. dealers Monday that includes employee-level discounts on almost all the Chevrolet cars and trucks in its showrooms. The discount offer…
  • Nonprofits push for federal ties. In the world of philanthropy, where independence from government has long been sacred, a revolution is underway. Social entrepreneurs are clamoring for a realignment of the way the federal government and nonprofit groups work together…
  • Engañada con el premio gordo. El viejo truco de la lotería sigue seduciendo a incautos y una anciana hispana perdió miles de dólares al creerse el cuento de una pareja que supuestamente se había ganado el premio gordo y necesitaba…
 

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